Viral

Pseudotype

Unit

Image description

Medway School of Pharmacy
Anson Building
Central Avenue
Chatham Maritime
Chatham
Kent
ME4 4TB


Tel: +44 (0)1634 202957

Email: msop.vpu@gmail.com

Twitter: @ViralPseudotype


Image description

Principal Scientist

Dr Nigel Temperton BSc MSc DLSHTM PGCHE PhD

 

Nigel obtained his BSc (Hons) in Microbiology and Genetics from University College London (UCL) in 1990 and an MSc in Applied Molecular Biology of Infectious Diseases (1992), PhD in Molecular Parasitology (1999) and DLSHTM (2000) from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM). After his PhD, Nigel returned to UCL as a post-doctoral scientist at the Centre for Virology (Royal Free Campus). In 2003 Nigel transferred to the MRC/UCL Centre for Medical Molecular Virology initially as a senior post-doctoral scientist and subsequently progressed to the level of Principal Investigator, funded by the MRC and industry. He is currently a Senior Lecturer in Biological Sciences at the Medway School of Pharmacy. Nigel is a Senior Associate Member of the Royal Society of Medicine (RSM), a member of the International Society for Influenza and other Respiratory Virus Diseases (ISIRV), the Biochemical Society and the Society for General Microbiology (SGM). In 2009 Nigel was elected as a member of the highly prestigious Medical Research Club, London.

 

Nigel’s research interests lie primarily in emerging/re-emerging and transboundary viruses (SARS coronavirus, pandemic/inter-pandemic influenza, rabies/lyssaviruses and flaviviruses) and the methods for their control, in particular, control by vaccination induced humoral responses. He has established novel virus antibody neutralization assays for high-containment viruses (Influenza H5N1/H7N1, SARS coronavirus and rabies) using retroviral and lentiviral vector technologies. He maintains many research collaborations (in the UK and worldwide) with academia (UCL, University of Oxford, University of Westminster, University of Nottingham), public/animal health laboratories (HPA/WHO/AHVLA/OiE), vaccine clinical trial centres (University of Siena and CEVAC, Ghent) and industry (vaccine and biotech companies). He is currently the primary supervisor for three PhD students (Francesca Ferrara, Keith Grehan and George Carnell) who are undertaking research projects on influenza and emerging bat viruses

 

Staff web page: http://www.msp.ac.uk/about/staff/biological/temperton_nigel.html

LinkedIn: http://uk.linkedin.com/in/nigeltemperton

Publications: http://scholar.google.co.uk/citations?user=ar7sLysAAAAJ&hl=en

Image description

Principal Scientist

Dr Simon D. Scott BSc PGCHE PhD


Simon completed his BSc in Microbiology & Virology at the University of Warwick in 1986, moving on to a PhD studentship at the University of Cambridge the same year. His PhD studies were some of the earliest gene identification and mapping work conducted on Marek’s disease herpesviruses. Subsequent postdoctoral research continued to focus on animal herpesviruses (murine at Cambridge University, equine at the Animal Health Trust in Newmarket), followed by work on human papillomavirus at the Free University, Amsterdam.

In 1995 he began his first gene therapy project, utilising Epstein-Barr virus and Cre/loxP genetic elements in vector construction. This led to the initiation of more than a decade of gene therapy vector work (in the UK then USA) investigating these elements in combination with various novel, inducible promoters for control of therapeutic gene expression. Adenovirus and lentivirus delivery systems were employed in these studies.


On return to the UK in 2005, from 3 years at Wayne State University in Michigan, Simon continued gene therapy research at the University of Sheffield, before joining the University of Kent (Medway School of Pharmacy) in 2006. His long-term interest in gene therapy vector technology led to a collaboration with Dr Nigel Temperton in 2010, and the establishment of the Viral Pseudotype Unit (VPU) in 2011. Returning to his early postdoctoral roots, in collaboration with a colleague from his time at the Animal Health Trust, Dr Janet Daly (University of Nottingham: http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/vet/people/janet.daly), Simon is now investigating the use of pseudotypes for serology of equine influenza. His other current interests are emerging exotic viruses (e.g. flaviviruses)


Staff web page: http://www.msp.ac.uk/about/staff/biological/scott_simon.html

LinkedIn:  http://uk.linkedin.com/pub/simon-scott/23/365/b87

Image description

PhD Student

Stuart Mather


In 2012, I received my BSc (Dual Hons) in Biochemistry and Biology from Keele University, conducting two final year research projects titled ‘Analysis of small nucleolar RNAs 44 and 50 in ovarian cancer cell lines’ and ‘Comparison of plugin accessory gland protein production in super males and inbred parental strains of Anopheles gambiae’. These projects required regular use of ELISA, PCR, gel electrophoresis, DNA extraction and bioinformatics. In 2011, I also completed a summer internship with Inspiralis Ltd, where I produced Mycobacterium tuberculosisand human DNA topoisomerase products, as well as performing SDS-PAGE, agarose gel electrophoresis assays and site-directed mutagenesis. I was also responsible for maintaining the company’s insect and bacterial suspension cell cultures. I am currently involved in a project concerning the development of pseudotyped virus assays to serologically study Japanese encephalitis and potentially other related flaviviruses.


e-mail: sm751@kent.ac.uk


Image description

PhD Student

Rebecca Kinsley

 

In 2013, I graduated from the University of Nottingham with a BSc (Hons) in Zoology. During my time at Nottingham, I had the opportunity to travel abroad to study the predatory behaviour of crab spiders (Synema globosum) in Portugal, as well as conducting biodiversity studies in the Peak District. Aside from the conversation aspect of my degree, my interest in virology led to my participation in a summer research project on Schmallenberg virus circulation at the School of Veterinary Medicine and Science in Nottingham.  The project involved acquisition and identification of potential insect vectors by DNA extraction, PCR, gel electrophoresis and viral RNA extractions. I am currently embarking on my PhD within the VPU, working on equine influenza virus pseudotypes as tools to study the immune response elicited by vaccination or natural infection of horses and how mutations in the haemmaglutinin gene can lead to cases of vaccine breakdown.

 

e-mail: rk320@kent.ac.uk

Image description

PhD Student

Keith Grehan

 

In 2004 Keith was awarded a BSc (Hons) in Zoology from University College Dublin completing a thesis titled “Nutrient trade off: A case study in caddis fly net building behaviour”. Keith then completed an MSc degree in Bioinformatics awarded by Dublin City University with a thesis titled “Reconstruction of the ancestral mammal genome” this project used comparative genomic techniques and sequence data downloaded from public database to identify regions of ancestral genomic sequence, these sequences were then combined to create a hypothetical proto-mammal genome. After this Keith began working for Quintiles in 2006 as a Clinical Data Manager working on a variety of studies at every stage of the drug production process. In 2011 Keith returned to University College Dublin to complete an MSc by research with a thesis titled “The evolution of microbial resistance in Vespertilionidae bats through analysis of Toll-like Receptors”. This project amplified the TLRs 1-10 in 16 distinct bat species and then performed detailed phylogenetic and selective pressure analysis on the novel sequences generated. Keith’s Phd is focused on development and application of pseudotype-based cell-entry assays for emerging bat viruses and seeks to develop novel pseudotype viruses to assess the sero-prevalence of emerging viral pathogens within the global bat population.

 

e-mail: kg287@kent.ac.uk

Image description


PhD Student

George Carnell


In 2008 I graduated from Imperial College London with a degree in Biology with Microbiology, focusing my modules primarily on parasites and viruses as well as molecular biology.  My final year project involved life cycle analysis of bio based materials, an interesting tangent from microbiology.  After a short hiatus I returned to academia in 2012, taking the Medical Microbiology MSc at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.  This course culminated in a 3 month project titled “Development of a methodology for whole genome amplification of West Nile virus”, which I carried out at the Animal Health and Veterinary Laboratories Agency (Weybridge).   The majority of my time was spent optimising RT and PCR reactions to obtain long distance PCR fragments from WNV RNA.  I also designed degenerate primers which were able to amplify a diverse range of lineages and strains of WNV as well as a rapid test to differentiate between lineage 1 and 2. My PhD project is set around the development of hybrid haemagglutinin pseudotyped lentiviruses which will be used to assess heterosubtypic immunity to influenza.

Former Lab Members 

Image description

PhD Student

Francesca Ferrara

 

In September 2008, I graduated from Università Vita-Salute San Raffaele with a Degree in Medical and Pharmaceutical Biotechnology. My Final Script concerned bioinformatics technologies to study gene expression. In November 2010, I graduated from Università Vita-Salute San Raffaele with an Advanced Degree in Medical, Molecular and Cellular Biotechnology. In January 2012 I started my PhD at the Medway School of Pharmacy, University of Kent. I am currently involved in the study of heterosubtypic antibody responses elicited by seasonal influenza vaccination using lentiviral pseudotyped particles.


Image description

Dr. Eleonora Molesti PhD

Dr. Molesti completed a postgraduate degree (Doctor of Philosophy) under the supervision of Dr. Nigel J. Temperton. Dr. Molesti graduated at Rochester Cathedral in July 2014 with a PhD entitled "The Development and Application of Influenza Pseudotype-based Neutralisation Assays".